American Sign Language Day

Connie Minnell    - “ This image was created in memory of my brother and in honor of his daughter (my niece), our family's own sign language expert!”

Connie Minnell - “This image was created in memory of my brother and in honor of his daughter (my niece), our family's own sign language expert!”

Every year on April 15, the community comes together to celebrate ASL Day. Why is April 15th ASL day? According to the ASL Day website, “National ASL Day is a day of observance celebrating American Sign Language. On April 15, 1817, the first school for the deaf in the United States opened.”

Lifeprint provides detailed review of American Sign Language history and highlights the first school for the Deaf in America. “The man responsible for bringing sign language to light in the United States is Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet.  Gallaudet studied the French ways and returned to America in 1817 where he founded the first school for the deaf in America, near present day Hartford, Connecticut. [America School for the Deaf (ASD) ]” (Lifeprint)

“Today, around one million people use American Sign Language (ASL) as their main way to communicate, according to Communication Service for the Deaf. Used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities, as well as those with communication disorders, in recent years it has received more resources and attention both online and in popular culture. “ (Newsweek)

ASL Day (Jon Savage and Adrean Clark) made a vlog introducing ASL Day in 2016

Hello! Have you noticed people talking about ASL Day? What is it? National ASL Day is an annual holiday celebrating American Sign Language! It takes place every year on April 15th.

Want to join in the celebrations and host an event? Check out our top ten list of ideas at http://ASLDAY.org ! You can also share your event and comment online using the #ASLDAY hashtag. We will be watching the feed and sharing posts with the community at the Facebook page.

Thank you for reading!

(Video Description: Jon Savage stands on-screen, sporting a handlebar mustache with his hair parted to the side. At top right is the National ASL Day logo.) Translation by Adrean Clark.



Mary PatriciaComment